As the diablo milestone nears…

In the openstack project, we’re nearing the “Diablo Milestone”. To a large respect, it’s the fourth release of OpenStack. Even as we close down on the tail end of this release, there has been and is a huge amount of movement in the project.

We have Quantum and Glance shifting to use Github as a repository, new processes (that would be using Gerrit) wrapped around GitHub to allow the project to have a “gated trunk” methodology, and lots of “motion” within the various projects. It’s pretty easy to see on Github, a little harder with launchpad (I just don’t have the tools handy to create the pretty graphs) – you can see the impact graphs for swift, keystone, glance, quantum, and openstack-dashbaord to see what I mean.

The shifting to Gerrit hasn’t been without it’s trials, but is coming along pretty well now. I really wish the GitHub folks had been a bit more amenable to putting in a field that external folks could use to store metadata about a pull request. Several folks from the OpenStack project (including myself) reached out to them about this, all rebuffed (nicely, but still). In fact, one of the suggestions I got back from the github’r support was “Why don’t you set up Gerrit?”

With the changes in core repository, lots of dependencies are shifting as well. Dashboard was broken a bit this week we kicked things around to get the dependencies to match the new locations, I think we’ve got all those pieces worked around now (pull request outstanding for openstack-dashboard). The other piece that really shifted and broke with these changes were the install scripts that we’ve been using to build and work on a developer’s environment. The cloudbuilder team at Rackspace recently created a whole new setup that works very nicely, so I think we’re going to drop our older scripts (based on over-extended versions of Vish’s excellent nova.sh script) and move to using their new “stack.sh“. (And yeah, of course we’ll want to mess with it ourselves, so I’ve forked it…)

Published by heckj

Joe has broad software engineering development and management experience, from startups to large companies. Joe works on projects ranging from mobile to multi-cloud distributed systems, has set up and led engineering teams and processes, as well as managing and running services. Joe also contributes and collaborates with a wide variety of open source projects, and writes online at https://rhonabwy.com/.

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