IOS 12 DevNote: Embedded Swift Frameworks and bitcode

A side project for the barista’s at my favorite haunt has been a fun “getting back into it” programming exercise for IOS 12. It’s a silly simple app that checks the status of the network and if the local WIFI router is accessible, and provides some basic diagnostic and suggestions for the gang behind the counter.

It really boils down to two options:

    Yep, probably a good idea to restart that WIFI router
    Nope, you’re screwed – the internet problem is upstream and there’s nothing much you can do but wait (or call the Internet service provider)

It was a good excuse to try out the new Network.framework and specifically NWPathMonitor. In addition to the overall availability, I wanted to report on if a few specific sites were responding that the shop often uses, and on top of that I wanted to do some poking at the local WIFI router itself to make sure we could “get to it” and then made recommendations from there.

As I dug into things, I ended up deciding to use a swift framework BlueSocket, with the idea that if I could open a socket to the wifi router, then I could reasonably assume it was accessible. I could have used Carthage or CocoaPods, but I wanted to specifically try using git submodules for the dependencies, just to see how it could work.

With XCode 10, the general mechanism of dragging in a sub-project and binding it in works extremely easily and well, and the issues I had really didn’t hit until I tried to get something up to the IOS App Store for TestFlight.

The first thing I encountered was the sub-projects had a variable for CFVersionBundle: $(CURRENT_PROJECT_VERSION) that apparently wasn’t getting interpolated and set when it was built as a subproject. I ended up making a fork of the project and hard-coding the Info.plist with the specific version. Not ideal, but something that’s at least tractable. I’m really hoping that this coming WWDC shows some specific Xcode/IOS integration improvements when it comes to Swift Package Manager. Sometimes the Xcode build stuff can be very “black box”, and it would be really nice to have a more clear integration point for external dependencies.

The second issue was a real stumper – even though everything was validating locally for a locally built archive, the app store was denying it. The message that was coming back:

Invalid Bundle – One or more dynamic libraries that are referenced by your app are not present in the dylib search path.

Invalid Bundle – The app uses Swift, but one of the binaries could not link to it because it wasn’t found. Check that the app bundles correctly embed Swift standard libraries using the “Always Embed Swift Standard Libraries” build setting, and that each binary which uses Swift has correct search paths to the embedded Swift standard libraries using the “Runpath Search Paths” build setting.

I dug through all the linkages with otool, and everything was looking fine – and finally google trawled across a question in StackOverflow. Near the bottom there was a suggestion to disable bitcode (which is on by default when you upload an IOS archive). I gave that a shot, and it all flowed through brilliantly.

I can only guess that when you’re doing something with compiled-from-swift dylib’s, the bitcode process does something that the app store really doesn’t like. No probably without the frameworks (all the code in the project directly), but with the frameworks in my project, bitcode needed to be turned off.

Made it through all that, and now it’s out being tested with TestFlight!

El Diablo Network Advisor